Polished messianic leadership of mining companies

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golly
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Polished messianic leadership of mining companies

Post by golly »

I have been looking into mining companies and I'm interested in a few aspects that come up for me, as someone interested in the effects of advertising, PR and the weaponized use of PR (lying intelligence operations).

My investigation began with curiosity around something called "The Eye of Grande" which looks like a portal into the Earth.
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Its location is just south of the Gila River Reservation south of Phoenix, Arizona. In this image other areas have been marked with red when Google flagged them for the search keyword "mine" for the area.
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Somehow I stumbled on this article from 2019 announcing that the Eye of Grande would be reopening under new management.
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CASA GRANDE — The old Sacaton Unit mine may reopen under a new name.

Elim Mining has purchased the old open pit mine located northwest of Casa Grande and is exploring the possibility of reopening the mine under the new name Cactus Mine, said John Antwi, president, CEO and director of Elim Mining.

“The opportunity to do business in Arizona is a big deal to us,” said Antwi, who has worked in the mining industry for more than 30 years. He said Elim Mining is exploring the mine site in order to determine what equipment and how many employees the company would need to restart the mine.

The primary resource the company hopes to get from the mine is copper but it will also be looking for smaller deposits of gold, silver and molybdenum. Molybdenum is used to strengthen steel and other metals.

This would be the start-up company’s first mine, he said, although certainly not the first mine that Antwi or Elim’s Chief Operating Officer Ian McMullan have worked on. Both men have 30 years of experience in the mining industry.

Once the company has determined its needs, a date to reopen the mine will be set, he said.

The company is hoping to hire the majority of its employees from Casa Grande and Pinal County, McMullan said.

“We want to partner with the community on this,” he said.

The company plans to contact Central Arizona College for help in finding skilled workers once the mine has been reopened.

The company is looking at a variety of the latest techniques and technology to efficiently and safely remove the ore from the ground, Antwi said. The mine does not plan to use in-situ mining techniques.

In-situ mining involves the pumping of chemicals into an ore deposit in order to dissolve the ore. The dissolved ore and chemicals are pumped out of the ground and processed. The technique avoids open pit or underground mining hazards but can cause problems if the chemicals leach into groundwater.

Antwi said the company places a high priority on protecting the environment, and in-situ mining techniques do not fit that priority for the site.

The company is also looking at ways to best conserve and efficiently use water at the mine.

“We understand how critical water is here,” Antwi said.

McMullan said several public open houses will be held over the coming months so the public will know when the company will start the hiring process and when the mine will reopen.

ASARCO (American Smelting And Refining Co.) operated the mine between April 1974 and March of 1984, according to Arizona Geological Survey records. The open pit portion of the mine is about 3,100 feet in diameter and 980 feet deep. The mine produced about 11,000 tons per day and employed up to 400 people. The processed ore was shipped by rail to an ASARCO smelter in El Paso, Texas.

While working the open pit mine, ASARCO drilled a second, underground mine to the east of the pit to try and reach a deeper ore deposit. That underground mine was never fully developed and was closed with the pit in 1984.

In 1985, ASARCO considered turning the pit mine into a landfill. The company dropped the idea in 1987 after strong public opposition to the project.

In 2009, the state of Arizona reached a $20 million settlement with ASARCO to clean up the site.
- https://www.pinalcentral.com/casa_grand ... edfb0.html

golly
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ASARCO (American Smelting And Refining Co.), Elim Mining and onward

Post by golly »

This led me to a curiosity around the company ASARCO (American Smelting And Refining Co.), which is apparently now under Grupo México, a large resource and investment company. (https://www.gmexico.com/en/Pages/corpor ... nance.aspx)

I was not able to locate much about the Mexican or Latinx investors, but Elim Mining pulled up another interesting kind of profile.

If you visit Elim Mining and click on About Us, you might reach pages like this: https://elimmining.com/management-and-b ... -directors
There you may find some interesting profiles such as these:
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I became especially interested when I saw these photos that look to me as if they could be touched up. I learned a lot about digital face editing from studying terribly photoshopped pictures that have served as critical story elements of huge famous news stories. I was studying the possibility of the famous images of victims of 9/11 being largely created and/or modified from photo morphing software and photo manipulations of all kinds. And so when I looked at these images I was able to recognize digital manipulation techniques.
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golly
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Confusingly polished leadership of mining companies

Post by golly »

Another interesting profile picture, in full size, looks as though it were so touched up that it almost looks like a deepfake or simulated version of someone's profile.
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Perhaps they just wanted a guaranteed "interesting" picture because they don't feel they are photogenic. I can certainly understand that. I myself do not have a symmetrical face. I know that many people are born with conditions that look a bit like this, with one eye in a different reflected position relative to the nose.
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It's interesting that they bothered to touch up these photos but they "missed" the bizarre glitches in the eyes. What could be the meaning behind such a mistake? Whatever it is, it must be an acceptable distortion of features in mining PR, because this other fellow has a similar issue with the image of his eyes:
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Ken Stowe, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Mining Engineering)
DIRECTOR
Director Since: September 2011

Ken Stowe began his career with Noranda Inc. and spent 21 years in progressive operational, research and development, and corporate roles. In 1999, Mr. Stowe was appointed President of Northgate Minerals and served as Chief Executive Officer from 2001 to 2011. He received the prestigious Canadian Mineral Processor of the Year Award in 2006, recognizing his superior accomplishments and contributions in the field of mineral processing. Previously, Mr. Stowe was a Director of Hudbay Minerals, Klondex Minerals, Zenyatta Ventures and Fire River Gold. He obtained a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Mining Engineering from Queen’s University.
You may notice that Klondex Minerals has appeared a number of times, so I wanted to look into that as well. I will get into the story I found on Klondex below.

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Elaine Ellingham

Post by golly »

Here is some more about the prolific Elaine Ellingham. According to Alamos Gold:
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Elaine Ellingham is Principal of Ellingham Consulting Ltd., Director of Almaden Minerals Ltd., Blue Thunder Mining Corporation, 79North Inc. and the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada. Ms. Ellingham has over 30 years of experience in mineral exploration, corporate development and investor relations for mining companies. She also spent eight years with the Toronto Stock Exchange, from 1997 to 2005, in a number of capacities including National Leader of Mining. Ms. Ellingham is a former Director of Wallbridge Mining Company Ltd., Aurania Resources Ltd., and Richmont Mines Inc. where she also acted as interim President and Chief Executive Officer from July to November 2014. Ms. Ellingham holds a Master of Science and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Toronto, and is a Professional Geoscientist.
And according to Aston Bay Announces Appointment of Elaine Ellingham to Advisory Board, JuniorMiningNetwork.com :
Mr. Thomas Ullrich reports:

TORONTO, ON / ACCESSWIRE / February 26, 2019 / Aston Bay Holdings Ltd. (TSX-V: BAY; OTCQB: ATBHF) ("Aston Bay" or the "Company") is pleased to announce the appointment of Elaine Ellingham, M.Sc., MBA, PGeo, to the Company's Advisory Board.

Ms. Ellingham is a geologist with over 35 years' experience with major and junior mining companies in exploration, business development, investor relations and senior executive roles. She spent eight years with the Toronto Stock Exchange serving in various capacities and has held directorships over the past ten years for several junior explorers through to mid-tier producers, where she has been a major contributor to strategic direction including hands-on with management in several situations. This included serving as a Director of Richmont Mines for eight years, six as lead director, as well as stepping in as interim CEO in 2014, and through to its recent take-over by Alamos Gold. She is currently a Director of the Prospectors and Developers Association and a member of the Ontario Securities Commissions` Small and Medium Enterprises Advisory Committee. She is currently an active director on the boards of Alamos Gold, Aurania Resources, and Almaden Minerals.

Elaine Ellingham commented, "I welcome the opportunity to join Don Taylor on Aston Bay's Advisory Committee, with a focus on providing support to Tom Ullrich as he further builds Aston Bay as a premier exploration company. The high degree of exploration experience and expertise of the Aston Bay team and Tom's focus on creating shareholder value will continue to drive the company forward towards significant discoveries."

Thomas Ullrich, Chief Executive Officer of Aston Bay, stated: "We are excited to have Elaine join our Advisory Board. She brings a wealth of exploration, corporate governance and financial markets experience, complementary skills to strengthen an already exceptionally solid team. She will provide significant support in our expansion into the United States with our Blue Ridge Project, as well as with our anticipated drill programs in Virginia and Nunavut this year."
-https://www.juniorminingnetwork.com/jun ... board.html

According the Wall Street Journal, we also have this tidbit:
Elaine Ellingham, 60
Director, Blue Thunder Mining, Inc.
Elaine Ellingham is a businessperson who has been at the head of 6 different companies. She is Chief Executive Officer of Marienberg Minerals Ltd. Ms. Ellingham is also President for Ellingham Consulting Ltd. and Manager at AuroVallis SARL and on the board of 7 other companies.

In her past career she held the position of Independent Director at Aurania Resources Ltd., President at Gamah International Ltd., Senior Vice President-Investor Relations at IAMGOLD Corp., Head-Investor Relations for Campbell Resources, Inc., Chairman for Williams Creek Gold Ltd., Lead Independent Director at Richmont Mines, Inc., Manager-Company Listings at Toronto Stock Exchange, Inc. and Head-Investor Relations for Rio Algom Exploration, Inc.

Elaine Ellingham received an undergraduate degree, a graduate degree and an MBA from the University of Toronto.
-https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/ ... e/55560616

So she has been in some roles, no longer active:
- a variety of roles (for eight years between 1997 to 2005) with the Toronto Stock Exchange, including National Leader of Mining and Manager-Company Listings
- a former Director of Wallbridge Mining Company Ltd.
- a former Director of Aurania Resources Ltd.
- a former Director of Richmont Mines Inc. (acquired by Alamos in 2017, where she served as interim President and CEO for a year)
- roles in mineral exploration, corporate development and investor relations for Aurania Resources Ltd.
- and St Joe Canada Inc.
- Senior Vice President-Investor Relations at IAMGOLD Corporation
- Head-Investor Relations at Campbell Resources Inc.
- Head-Investor Relations at Rio Algom Exploration Inc.
- and Chairman for Williams Creek Gold Ltd.

And today or recently she's:
- a Director of the Prospectors and Developers Association
- a member of the Ontario Securities Commissions` Small and Medium Enterprises Advisory Committee
- an active Director on the board of Alamos Gold
- an active Director on the board of Aurania Resources
- an active Director on the board of Almaden Minerals
- advisor to Aston Bay (wow, a lot of A's!)
- Director of Elim Mining
- Director of Blue Thunder Mining
- CEO of Marienberg Minerals Ltd.
- Manager at AuroVallis SARL
- President for Ellingham Consulting Ltd. (presumably her own consulting company)
- On the board of 7 "other companies" probably partially listed above

Just how many mining companies can a single person advise on? It's awesome. Maybe it doesn't take as much to be a director as I thought. Just some degrees in geology and some smarts. Could it also just be a matter of connections and being in the right place at the right time? I hope one day I can be as desirable for advice as Ms. Ellingham. I wonder if there is some kind of profit motive though, which gives her incentive to serve on so many resource-extracting and money-collecting services.

As a leader of something that could be loosely described as a "community" (community of greedy investors?) I can't help but wonder if she could not serve humanity better if she were not so focused on asset acquisition. For example, with such a powerful leadership capability, would she not be a better natural chief of some kind of skill besides raping the Mother? Instead of digging into the Earth and collecting minerals and metals, what if she could focus on ecologically better ways of togetherness?

golly
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Alamos Gold

Post by golly »

Alamos Gold also has some interesting characters that appear to be photoshopped for PR reasons. For example, another Toronto-based leader of men is the one and only J. Robert S. Prichard
...a lawyer, non-executive Chairman of Torys LLP and former Chair of BMO Financial Group. Mr. Prichard is also a Director of Onex Corporation, George Weston Ltd., Chair of the Board of Trustees at the Hospital for Sick Children and President Emeritus of the University of Toronto. He taught law at the University of Toronto, Yale University and Harvard University and served as Dean of Law from 1984 to 1990 and President from 1990 to 2000 at the University of Toronto. Mr. Prichard subsequently served as President and CEO of Torstar Corporation and of Metrolinx, before serving as Chair of Metrolinx from 2010 to 2018. He also served as a Director of Barrick Gold from 2015 to 2019. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Member of the Order of Ontario, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Institute of Corporate Directors. He attended Swarthmore College, the University of Chicago (MBA), the University of Toronto (LLB) and Yale University (LLM).
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As you can see from this video of the fellow from back in 2010: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGkUFldGA-o
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... the wrinkles fading over one another is somewhat accurate to his face. But the plastic appearance is probably a consequence of the digital editing. Another picture of this figure from another site is the same but with a background to it. So I assume this is the PR photo he had edited to his satisfaction.

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The lie of mining as heroism

Post by golly »

Rags to riches: a Klondex story
https://www.miningglobal.com/supply-cha ... ndex-story

This link brings you to an interesting cover story about Klondex's investments prior to its acquisition by the Silver mining megacompany Hecla. The concept is that it is "hard work" that brings mining companies untold amounts of wealth to the investors, but the mother Earth or how to treat it is not mentioned. Neither is the environment that produced the wealth they are stripping from her. For example, it is cited in the article:
As a third generation miner, Huet’s upbringing in the mining industry has ingrained the CEO with a tremendous work ethic and matching attitude to work hard no matter what you do.

“I saw firsthand from my father the work ethic needed to be successful in the mining industry,” said Huet.

“He just turned 70 years old and still wakes up every day at 4:30 a.m. to work at an underground mine. He doesn’t know how to fail and that’s our culture here at Klondex.”
As though getting up early to beat slaves or getting up early to exploit labor or getting up early to self-mutilate were a virtue that proves the Huet family deserves the profits they get. Of course the workers who are just there to collect a pay check would not say "we are hurting Earth for private gain so it's okay." or "At least I am not treated like a slave or resource to be used up at all costs. Just the Earth."

So the "rags to riches" story is about cronyism and nepotism. Personal connections that convince related businesses to continue exploitative business.

The work they are doing is of questionable value to humanity. While people starve and get disease and are actively oppressed by racism (and racist imperialist colonizing efforts such as mining), and while mining companies typically pollute the environment and disrupt natural systems, still we think "Oh well, it must be necessary" or "There is no better way" to get technology to work. I think if we made computers in a better way, we would not need these mining companies. However, we are all caught up in this confusing leadership of mining companies. They say "We work hard" while their employees actually work hard, and the "hard work" the CEOs do is to convince millionaire people and companies they know well enough to invest in resource extraction to make more money.

Greed is the driving force of the leadership, and greed and "the need to provide for families" is the driving force of the employees that agree to serve these greedy leaders. And the PR companies make bizarre images that depict these leaders as valuable, but not necessarily totally human but perhaps "super human". Strange photoshopped appearances, glitchy eyes and so on; none of this glitzy digital makeup seems to matter because the important thing is that their skin appears tight and shiny at 300 pixels wide, their hair has a "professional" appearance, and they wear the clothing that denotes serious and profitable business.

It's time we stopped thinking this way. The Earth deserves more respect than just to be used without thanks and without consideration for its own needs as a life form. It's time we stopped respecting this fake appearance as the things really deserving of respect in society. When I think about it this way, these highly edited pictures are shameful and embarrassing. They represent the culture of greed-encouraging, division-exploiting banking, of Rothschild businesses that focus on hoarding personal wealth, of Anglo, English, French and other leaderships that stepped away from indigenousness and toward pure greed, colonization and resource collection.

Another sad aspect to me is that the greed seems to always come first and the uses of the resources are apparently some justifying afterthought. What amazing things could these driven people who know of minerals accomplish if they did soulful work, work of the spirit, and turned their inventiveness to medicine, to Earthen technology, to preserving ecological families and communities? The world may not know at this time. Maybe if reincarnation is real, they will have a chance to do better.

golly
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Cobalt mining should not be this evil

Post by golly »

I don't normally link to Reuters but it's pretty incredible that this story even made it to a headline:

"Tesla, Apple among firms accused of aiding child labor in Congo" By Matthew Lavietes in December 2019
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN1YK24F
It marked the first time the tech industry jointly has faced legal action over the source of its cobalt.

Images in the court documents, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington D.C., showed children with disfigured or missing limbs.

Six of the 14 children in the case were killed in tunnel collapses, and the others suffered life-altering injuries, including paralysis, it said.

“These companies - the richest companies in the world, these fancy gadget-making companies - have allowed children to be maimed and killed to get their cheap cobalt,” Terrence Collingsworth, an attorney representing the families, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
It also includes Microsoft and Dell.

Now when people tell me I am crazy for keeping a used computer for 7 years and resisting operating system changes, I can hopefully have the presence of mind to bring them to this understanding. Computers are not sourced well at the moment. There needs to be a change.

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